Day 31 Toronto to Barrie, Ontario

Took a lot of work to navigate out of the city. Which slowed down our 100km ride by a lot. The whole ride took us 4h50min, meaning our average speed was 20.3km/h. We tried following the bike path along the Humber River but it frequently started and stopped. We eventually made it out onto Islington Ave which turned into hwy 27. It was pretty nice riding with a paved shoulder most of the way and gentle rolling hills. Today we gained 100m of elevation.

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A trip highlight!

Wow so much to say about the last 24hrs, this post might be a bit long. I think my favorite 15km of this entire ride was from Cobourg to Port Hope building site yesterday morning. A group of Habitat volunteers joined us.

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It was a ton of fun and I am so thankful to Klaus for organizing and leading the group.

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After the ride, we took a tour of the semi that they are in the midst of building.

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It was really worth

while to be inside of a Habitat house and see where all my efforts of the last few months are going. What I really noticed about the tour was not so much the building but the people.There are so many involved in the building of a home. The restore volunteers, the committee for choosing a family, the volunteers that work directly on the house, plus the volunteers that keep them organized, fueled and trained. Habitat really has something for everyone. Its great to see that such a group of diverse people are able to contribute to an important cause together and have fun doing it. It really builds not just a home, but a community with a conscience.

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I am glad to be involved in pushing for better housing for low income families.

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I could have spent all day at the building site, but we had some ground to cover. So we hopped on our bikes and continued along the waterfront trail (a cycling route that runs along Lake Ontario). Thanks to Klaus’ maps we were able to navigate with ease for the first 50km. Once we hit Whitby we thought we would be ok to jump on the secondary highway. Unfortunately, GTA secondary roads are not as glamorous as New Brunswick’s. No shoulder and zooming traffic, we were anxious to find the waterfront trail again. Our rough navigating led us down a few dead ends. At one point found ourselves in a little park with no sign of a path

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other than the one a hundreds feet below us.

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Later our route led us right into the middle of the greek festival. The street was packed!

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Thankfully we met some bikers who pointed us in the right direction. And let us try out their bikes!

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After a day full of adventure it was nice to sit down to a massive delicious meal of ethiopian food.

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I am not sure if you can see the portion in the picture but its massive. I still can’t get over how hard it is to keep up with a cyclist’s metabolism.

Now for a day off in Toronto before we head north!

Ahh its the final week!

I cannot believe that in less than a week we will be riding into lee park. Part of me is ready for the change after cycling all day for the past month. Part of me doesn’t want to stop. I hope the transition isn’t to hard otherwise I might have to bring a stationary bike to class for the first week of school.
Plans for our arrival are going well. Its just a matter of getting the word out. So if you are reading this and know someone who will be in North Bay on Saturday tell them the following.
“URGENT message: get out your calendar and scratch out whatever is marked on Aug 18 to replace it with the following two details
1: at 11:15am group ride from lakeshore Dr/Kate paceway junction (near Sunset Park public school) to lee park (6km), its not a race just come out and pedal with us!

2: BBQ and cornroast at Lee Park 11:30- til we run out of food and/or you get tired of hearing our stories…I am guessing around 2or 3 pm.
All the details are on fb page http://www.facebook.com/ride4home

Ok so back to the ride. Yesterday’s ride passed through many cute little villages along Lake Ontario. In Coulborne all the trees were knitted.

We are currently staying at Margaret and Klaus’ in Cobourg. They are two Habitat volunteers that have been incredibly generous hosts! We had a wonderful evening visiting and exchanging travel stories with them.

This morning a group rides with us to Port Hope. I am sure you will hear all about it soon!

Lastly, I am so pleased to see donations are still coming in. Its inspiring, keep it up!!

Habitat connection

This morning we woke up at our nice little camp spot next to the canal locks. It was a nice change to be tenting next to boats instead of rvs.

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The morning was rainy. Nellie and I didn’t talk much as we pedalled, squinting through the rain and trying to ignore our soaked jackets sticking to our arms.
The rain started to clear as we hit California so we busted out the sunscreen! Perhaps unnecessarily.

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Then we got into Kingston, where the Habitat for Humanity affiliate would be hosting us. Our first stop was their Restore! It was so exciting to see the Habitat symbol somewhere other than my cards for the first time in months.

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We stopped and got a photo just outside before heading to the Hotel that the Habitat affiliate had found for us. (Thank you Ambassador Hotel for donating a room!). We were both greatly in need of a shower before dinner with two members of the Habitat board of directors.

Of course when we got in the priority became watching some Olympic games for Nellie

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and getting a picture of my largest chain grease tattoo yet!

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The amount of time I have spent scrubbing my legs over the course of this trip is just silly.
Dinner was lovely. Nick, David and Margo were all quite excited to hear about our trip and Nellie and I were equally as excited to hear about Habitat’s work in the area.

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Fun fact from David: every 24 seconds a new house is built in the world by Habitat. That’s huge.

Its sometimes a little discouraging to think about the immense amount of money and work it takes to build a house. It makes my efforts feel small. I guess that’s the reality of it. I know this trip’s fundraising won’t build much, but atleast its something and more importantly it has challenged hundreds of people to contribute to a cause they might not otherwise think about. People still need housing, so we will keep pedalling.